Constructive Citizenship Integrity, Security and Anti-Corruption

Address to BCS Argentina - Business Compliance Solutions

  Julia Vogl from the  "Urban City Myth"  series. 

Julia Vogl from the "Urban City Myth" series. 

Buenos Aires –

On September 10, 2014, Frank Vogl spoke at the BCS Congress in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He asked the question: Why should things be different? And he responded - The answer rests in the fact that over the last 20 to 30 years the world has changed in revolutionary ways. Now, as never before, the train heading for open and decent government is on the tracks and gaining speed. If you do not see it coming you will be shocked and surprised. If you have the wisdom to see where it is going, then it is time that you jumped on board. 

President John F. Kennedy declared to Americans, “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” In too many countries we see politicians, officials and business people asking, “What can my country do for me?”… the combination of a rising educated middle-class in much of Latin America, the globalization of business, the scale and speed of today’s capital markets, the revolution in information technologies and the dynamic growth of civil society – all these trends are combining to promote transparency and accountability. For business and government in Argentina the issue is whether leaders wish to climb aboard the anti-corruption train as it now gathers speed across the world, or allow the train to pass and inevitably experience still more major problems in the economy and in democratic governance.

The presentation concluded as follows: -

The issue for business people today goes far beyond regulatory anti-corruption compliance. To check the boxes on the compliance forms is no assurance that anything will change.

Integrity in business starts with the tone at the top of the enterprise. The example that leaders of business provide by their own activities can do more than anything else to build corporate values, to establish trust with business partners, at home and abroad.

The business case for values of integrity and anti-corruption has never been stronger and it is set to get still stronger. The rising middle-class will not sit still and see itself squeezed by old elites, or populist politicians driven only by their own greed and arrogance.

You may think that my perspective is unrealistic and that my comments do not apply to Argentina. I respond by suggesting that you take note of the march of recent history. Yes, there are many setbacks and yes in many parts of the world the scale of corruption is absolutely terrible. But, the negatives need to be seen clearly alongside positive developments.The revolutions that created the end of regimes in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt and Ukraine in recent years were all led by civil society organizers able to use social media and other tools to channel the anger of the public at large at the corruption in their governments.

The forces of anti-corruption, promoting transparency and accountability, and demanding justice, are unstoppable. The transformative changes in global finance and business, in media technology and civil society organization all come together to build a compelling case for constructive citizenship.

President John F. Kennedy declared to Americans, “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” In too many countries we see politicians, officials and business people asking, “What can my country do for me?”… the combination of a rising educated middle-class in much of Latin America, the globalization of business, the scale and speed of today’s capital markets, the revolution in information technologies and the dynamic growth of civil society – all these trends are combining to promote transparency and accountability. For business and government in Argentina the issue is whether leaders wish to climb aboard the anti-corruption train as it now gathers speed across the world, or allow the train to pass and inevitably experience still more major problems in the economy and in democratic governance.

 

 

Download
Frank Vogl address to BCS Argentina September 10 2014

 

Also see full page interview in La Nacion

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